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1/17: Dean's Lecture Series: Trojan Horse or Troilus’ Whore? Pandering Statecraft and Political Stagecraft in Troilus and Cressida

Originally Posted on admin, January 17, 2013

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Santa Fe

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
1/17/13

Contact
Gabe Gomez 
(505) 660-1616
ggomez@sjc.edu

 

St. John’s College Dean’s Spring Lecture and Concert Series Presents:

Trojan Horse or Troilus’ Whore?
Pandering Statecraft and Political Stagecraft in Troilus and Cressida

Nalin Ranasinghe

(SANTA FE, NM) Nalin Ranasinghe’s reading of Shakespeare’s rancid comedy Troilus and Cressida explores the role played by Ulysses in engineering Troy’s fall. Although Troilus’ waning love for Cressida was re-kindled by her removal to the Greek camp, this second Hector is soon turned into a “dead man walking” by Ulysses. Only allowed to see Cressida through carefully framed perspectives from afar, Troilus—the last best hope of Troy—concludes that she has been monstrously unfaithful to him and pursues vengeance regardless of risk or responsibility. This device parallels the way Ulysses inclined Achilles towards spurning Polyxena’s love and fighting Hector. While Troilus’ and Cressida’s cynicism seems to differ sharply from Homeric heroism, closer reading suggests that the tragic wisdom of the Iliad is recast by Shakespeare in a less heroic key—one better suited to an age of commodity.

Nalin Ranasinghe earned his doctorate from Pennsylvania State University and currently is professor of philosophy at Assumption College. He has written three books on Socrates: Socrates and the Underworld (2009), The Soul of Socrates (2000), and Socrates and the Gods (2012). He also has edited Logos and Eros—festschrift honoring Stanley Rosen—and published essays on Homer, The Bible, Shakespeare, Kant, Nietzsche, Arendt, and Walter Benjamin.

 

Friday, February 1, 7:30 p.m.
Great Hall, Peterson Student Center
St. John’s College
1160 Camino Cruz Blanca
Santa Fe, NM 87505
Free Admission