Back to Blog Posts

“That time of year thou mayst in me behold,” presented by Jacques Duvoisin

Originally Posted on cgruber, July 14, 2014


What:                   “That time of year thou mayst in me behold,” presented by Jacques Duvoisin, a tutor at St. John’s College, Santa Fe

 

When:                  Wednesday, July 16, 3:15 p.m.

 

Where:                 Junior Common Room, Peterson Student Center

                                   St. John’s College, 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca

 

Admission:           Free

 

Details:               

Duvoisin will discuss Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73 (“That time of year thou mayst in me behold”), with special attention to the rhetorical structure of the poem—its use of tropes to work through the various ways death inhabits life. The sonnet speaks of “bare ruin’d quires,” of “death’s second self,” and “the ashes of his youth”—in each case, enacting an ambiguity between the written word and the reality it names, as if to say that the reality of death is inseparable from our ability (or inability) to name it.

Duvoisin received a bachelor of arts degree in 1980 from St. John’s College, Annapolis, and went on to earn a master of arts and a doctorate in 1984 and 1992, respectively, from The Catholic University of America. Before joining the faculty of St. John’s College, Santa Fe, he was a Knights of Columbus Fellow (1981–1984) and a visiting fellow in the University of London’s School for Advanced Studies, Institute of Philosophy.

For more information call 505-984-6000.

"If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things."
- Descartes