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12/05/13: Spend a Saturday Morning

Originally Posted on admin, December 5, 2013

News & Publications

Spend a Saturday Morning Exploring Great Works at St. John's College

FOR RELEASE: December 5, 2013
CONTACT:  Gregory Shook, 410-626-2539 
gregory.shook@sjca.edu

St. John's College invites the community to explore timeless texts and ideas by participating in a Saturday Seminar. Sponsored by the Friends of St. John's College, these seminars attract about 200 participants of various ages, experiences, and backgrounds. Participants join in groups of approximately 15 to 20 for one of nine seminars. Seminars will be held in Mellon Hall on February 22 (snow date: March 8) from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Participants may continue discussions over a buffet luncheon in the Francis Scott Key Lobby following the seminars. Registration is required; cost is $50. Early registration is recommended. To view seminar descriptions, schedule information, and to register, visit www.stjohnscollege.edu, then click on "Events & Programs," then "Saturday Seminars." For more information: Alice Chambers at 410-295-5544 or alice.chambers@sjca.edu

What is a Saturday Seminar? Saturday Seminars are 90-minute discussions led by St. John's faculty members, called tutors, who selected the readings—either a classic work drawn from the St. John's curriculum or a reading chosen for the author's thoughts and ideas which have universal relevance. This year, the readings include "The Cherry Orchard" by Anton Chekhov; "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald; "Billy Budd" by Melville; "Why I Live at the P.O." by Eudora Welty; and "The Dream of a Ridiculous Man" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, among others. Participants choose one of the topics listed, read the assigned text in advance, and then join with others in a discussion of the work. No previous knowledge of the subject or author is required. Seminar participants are responsible for their own text.


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